Archive for islam

Religious terrorism or mental illness?

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , on November 9, 2009 by arievergreen

Lauren Cox’s Fort Hood Motive Terrorism or Mental Illness? brings up some very interesting questions about Nidal Malik Hasan’s shooting rampage at Fort Hood. Was he fighting for Islam, or was he lonely and insane? Or was it both?

“I think it would be a mistake for people to theorize [he did this] because he is an adherent of this or that religious faith,” said Dinwiddie, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago. “The mental illness comes first, then flowing from that is the adoption of perhaps, unusual, religious beliefs.”

Afkhami also wondered if the public will place too much emphasis on Hasan’s religion. Based on Afkhami’s experience lecturing and working with the military, and plain common sense, it follows that few, if any, of those who oppose the war have turned to radical acts such as a shooting rampage.

“We’re missing a core underlying issue, there are tons of religious folks who are morally opposed to the war on some level who are still serving in the military and get things done,” said Afkhami.

Rather, Afkhami is convinced that a combination of stressors in Hasan’s life — especially in his role as a military psychiatrist — could have led him to a breakdown.

In this story, and in many things posted on this blog, we can see how religion and insanity (or even just power – take George W. Bush and his conversations with god for example) mix with dangerous results. If someone is feeling persecuted, and their religion says they’re on the side of god while others are evildoers, the stage is set for god-sanctioned retribution.

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“This was an attempt at an honor killing.”

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 9, 2009 by arievergreen

s-NOOR-ALMALEKI-largeNoor Faleh Almaleki Dies: Iraqi Woman In US Dead After Father Runs Her Over For Being Too Westernized (Huffington Post):

“By his own admission, this was an intentional act and the reason was that his daughter had brought shame on him and his family,” Low said. “This was an attempt at an honor killing.”

Family members had told police that Almaleki attacked his daughter because he believed she had become too Westernized and was not living according to his traditional Iraqi values.

He ran her and her boyfriend’s mom down with his car. Almaleki, 20, died after being in a coma for two weeks and undergoing spinal surgery. It seems the other woman, Amal Khalaf, will survive.

Links roundup: What’s up, religion?

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 28, 2009 by arievergreen

I’ve been saving these ones up – stories of ordinary people who are subjected to oppression for religious reasons. (And several of them resist successfully!) Isn’t religion supposed to improve our quality of life, not destroy it?

Ironic similarity of Iranian women to Iranian Baha’i’s

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 5, 2009 by arievergreen

For the past 400 years… Iranian women have been second class citizens. From forced wearing of the hijab, whether its full chador or roosari to a whole host of other things that most of us Iranian men have known and know about but haven’t given enough crap to correct; examples are laws of divorce, inheritance, jobs, salaries, mandatory husband permission to do many things, custody etc etc. Bottom line, if you ask most women in Iran if they feel equal to men, the answer is NO. Women have been systematically oppressed via teachings of Islam and men have benefited from this for at least 4 centuries… Since the very first weeks of the so called revolution of 1980 and the formation of the Islamic Republic, the government of IRI has systematically done everything possible to make second class citizens out of the Bahais. The steps taken included but were not limited to: 1) confiscation of real and personal property 2) prohibition of work in public or private enterprieses 3) prohibition of enterance into institutes of higher eductaion (public or private universities) 4) creation of an atmosphere of fear and in some cases encouragement to leave Iran.

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What after 377?

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , , , on August 5, 2009 by arievergreen

So far, the rule of thumb in India has been to remain invisible in times of persecution. During Hindu-Muslim riots, Muslims would change their names to avoid being butchered. Dalits learnt to hide their surnames or change their religion to free themselves from an oppressive system that had religious sanction. The more visible you made yourself in times of adversity, the more vulnerable you made yourself. It is a self-perpetuating role-play between the persecutor and victim. Being a minority means being a victim, and being a majority automatically means being a persecutor… In such a scenario, most sexual minorities survived by simply staying underground. As a survival instinct, many pretend to be heterosexual or simply don’t wish to make public their sexual orientation.

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Iran’s Theocracy Implodes

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 5, 2009 by arievergreen

Khomeini then used his personal popularity and revolutionary authority to install an absolutism centered on velayat-e faqih or guardianship of Islamic jurists headed by an autocratic supreme leader. The current supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei follows the tenets of his late teacher, regarding himself as God’s singular representative on Earth. To a growing number of Iranians, however, religious fundamentalism is a luxury they can no longer afford. Half of them are under the age of 40 with no ideological connection to the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Their difficulties and desires of life take precedence over doctrine and dogma. At least 12 percent of adults are unemployed. An inflation rate of about 20 percent saps their meager purchasing power. They face a housing shortage. They are frustrated as well by 30 years of sociopolitical repression impinging on all aspects of daily life in the name of religion.

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Nigerian police find sect women

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 2, 2009 by arievergreen

Police in northern Nigeria say they have found another group of women and children abducted by the Boko Haram sect, locked in a house in Maiduguri. The group were in a deplorable condition, officials said, suffering from pneumonia, fever and rashes… More than 200 women and children have now been found over the last week, locked in buildings in Maiduguri… A Red Cross official told the BBC in Maiduguri that the women had been abducted by Boko Haram from six different states across northern Nigeria. Last week, the police rescued about a 100 young women and children from a house on the edge of the city. Many said they were the wives of sect members, and had been forced to travel to Maiduguri from Bauchi state. The BBC reporter in Maiduguri says the Boko Haram sect believed that their families should accompany them to the battlefield.

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