Archive for media

More on Paul Haggis’ split with Scientology

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , , on October 28, 2009 by arievergreen

David Gibson’s Is Scientology a Cult? Is Paul Haggis the Next Martin Luther? gives a little more information about the director’s split with Scientology over their support for Proposition 8.

Interestingly, Gibson suggests Haggis could improve rather than reject Scientology:

One mark of a “real” religion is its ability to reform or adapt. Some religions could be said to begin as cults and over time transform into religions. Similarly, religious traditions, or parts of them, can also degenerate into cults. But cults generally don’t last long because they are so obsessive and rigid that they cannot change in the face of challenges. Perhaps Haggis needs to start his own branch of Scientology. It’s a model that has worked before.

Judging by the inability of many “real” religions to, say, grant women and queer folks and people in other religions equal consideration and respect, I’m not sure that such a reform movement would do much to improve upon Scientology. Wouldn’t its transition from a questionably-culty new religion to a bonafide 100% legitimate religion just give them more power to control people?

Read Scientology: Ecclesiastical justice, Part 3 of 3 in a special report on the Church of Scientology, for a glimpse into the controlling world of this belief system.

Previously:
Links roundup: What’s up, religion?

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The Nightmare of Christianity

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 30, 2009 by arievergreen

Max Blumenthal, writing for the Nation, describes how a young man went from being oppressed as a young Christian, to rebellion via various occult traditions, to murder and suicide. The media played a part in blaming his violence on his beliefs during his rebellious phase, while avoiding or glossing over the crucial role his earlier brainwashing played in eroding his mental health. This story is three pages long, and well worth the read.

A few miles down the road from Colorado Springs [a home to James Dobson’s Focus on the Family], in the quiet bedroom community of Eldredge, a deeply disturbed young man named Matthew Murray followed the unfolding debacle at New Life Church [once under the stewardship of Pastor Ted Haggard] with an interest that bordered on obsession. Murray, a sallow-faced, bespectacled 24-year-old, had been indelibly scarred by a lifetime of psychological abuse at the hands of his charismatic Pentecostal parents. Murray’s mind became crowded with thoughts of death, destruction, and the killings he would soon carry out in the name of avenging what he called his “nightmare of Christianity.”

Read the rest and leave comments. What do you think will happen with the many kids being raised the same way Murray was?

Links Roundup: Lots o’ wrongness

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 30, 2009 by arievergreen

I haven’t updated in a while, but I sure have saved up a lot of links! Here’s a whole batch of wrongness all over the world – and all of it done in the name of god.

Any of these stories speak to you? Please comment.

The Friendly Face Of Hate

Posted in Wrongness with tags , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2009 by arievergreen

Gawker on Brian Brown, the executive director of the anti-gay hate group the National Organization for Marriage:

His job is to come up with rational-sounding logical-sounding arguments designed only to reinforce irrational prejudices while making sure those who hold those prejudices don’t have to feel bad about being prejudiced… All of Brown’s Debating Club arguments are built on simple, elementary fallacies, but that doesn’t actually matter, because he is simply coming up with justifications for bigotry.

Read the rest